Monthly Archives: August 2014

Arrival at final Alaskan stop on this crazy adventure

Drive to Skagway

Drive to Skagway

The drive from Beaver Creek, Yukon Territory to our final Alaskan destination, Skagway, was spectacular. Best of all, we managed to cross the border back into Alaska without incident. (I was pretty convinced our passports were flagged after our last Alaskan border crossing- the border “crashing” event). Our Skagway “home” was a cabin at the Chilkoot Trail Outpost. The Outpost was down a 7 mile unpaved, narrow road with blind curves. Since it was a busy road, driving back and forth to town was quite an adventure. For some reason Dad is not a fan of “dangling over precipices”. It was well-worth the commute, though. While downtown Skagway was very touristy, Chilkott was a peaceful getaway. Four grizzlies were also in residence out there..and they never get old!

Gooney Bird Weather Vane

Gooney Bird

Gooney Bird

Passing through Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, we saw an airplane on a pedestal. A little investigation proved interesting. Civilians know the aircraft as a Douglas DC-3, the military designates it a C-47, and pilots everywhere affectionately call it a Gooney Bird. The Gooney Bird’s place in aviation history cannot be overstated. Though the total hours on the airframe of this aircraft (31,000 +/-) is unremarkable, it lived out most of its life as a bush plane, on wheels and skis, in the Yukon. Interested parties rescued this bird from going to the scrape yard, restored its appearance and turned it into a weather vane.

Buckshot Betty’s – We Gambled and Won

Beaver Creek, YT

Beaver Creek, YT

Leaving Seward for Skagway, our plan was to drive to Tok, Alaska the first day, spend the night in Tok, then drive on to Skagway the following day. Having started earlier than usual, we found ourselves arriving in Tok early in the afternoon, leaving a LONG drive, with two border crossings, for the next day. Taking a chance, with serious reservations, we pushed on to Beaver Creek, Yukon Territory, hoping a place we had seen advertised, Buckshot Betty’s, would be at least tolerable. Besides having an additional two hours of driving under our belt we would also have one of the border crossings behind us. Beaver Creek is the western most community in Canada. Buckshot Betty’s turned out to be just fine. The restaurant had a varied menu and the little cabin we stayed in was well appointed and immaculate.

Adventure day in Seward

Paddling across Resurrection Bay

Paddling across Resurrection Bay

Spent another day in Seward on the water. Kayaked across Resurrection Bay in the morning, stopped on the beach of an uninhabited island for lunch and a hike, then sailed back to port. So good for the soul. I’m not sure which was more colorful..the scenery or our kayak guide and sailboat captain. Both were full of interesting stories. The captain had even lived with a native tribe in northern Alaska and helped them hunt whales. Not a job for wimps!

Kenai Fjords Tour

Northwestern Glacier

Northwestern Glacier

Our visit to Seward, Alaska was prompted by the recommendation of an on-line acquaintance who suggested we go to Seward and take the Northwestern Fjords Tour, in the Kenai Fjords National Park, if we did nothing else. As the date of the tour approached, I started having misgivings about being captive on a boat for nine hours and was wishing I had not committed to that tour.

The tour was all that it had been promised to be by the acquaintance and by the tour company. The boat was a purpose-built tour boat that was very comfortable in its accommodations and motion. It allowed excellent viewing, in every direction, of marine life and geological features either from within the climate-controlled cabin or from the deck.

Addie and I were initially more interested in the marine mammals than rocks and glaciers. It turned out that the rocks and glaciers were as fascinating as the critters. The captain of the tour boat, who had been doing that tour for twenty years, was great. The amount of information he provided along the way, undoubtedly carefully researched and scripted, was voluminous and entertaining. Wildlife was plentiful; we saw Orcas, Humpback Whales, Sea Otters, Seals, Sea Lions, Bald Eagles, Puffins and numerous other bird species. The tour’s climax was reaching the Northwestern Glacier. It is magnificent and the captain put the eighty-something foot boat within a boat length or two of the glacier and very slowly pinwheeled in place for thirty minutes so everyone could get all the pictures they wanted. Besides the awesome views in every direction, I thought that was an impressive bit of boat handling.

What I feared would be a too-long day, passed quickly and was over all to soon.